“The Guys”

© Teklanika Photography 2010
© Teklanika Photography 2010

Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni)
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
Sony A200
Sony 75-300mm lens @ 300mm
1/250 sec @ f5.6
iso 200
© Teklanika Photography 2010

“Bull Elk in Velvet”

© Teklanika Photography 2010
© Teklanika Photography 2010

Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni)
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
Sony A200
Sony 75-300mm lens @ 120mm
1/400 sec @ f5.6
iso 400
© Teklanika Photography 2010

“Meadow Bull”

© Teklanika Photography 2010
© Teklanika Photography 2010

Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni)
Roosevelt National Forest, Colorado
Sony A200
Sony 75-300mm lens @ 280mm
1/500 sec @ f5.6
iso 125
© Teklanika Photography 2010

“Wapiti”

© Teklanika Photography 2013
© Teklanika Photography 2013

“Wapiti”

Elk or Wapiti (Cervus canadensis)
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
04/12/2013
Canon 7D
Canon 100-400mm lens @ 190mm
1/320 sec @ f5
iso 200
© Teklanika Photography 2013

“Spring Bull”

© Teklanika Photography 2013
© Teklanika Photography 2013

“Spring Bull”

Elk or Wapiti (Cervus canadensis)
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
04/12/2013
Canon 7D
Canon 100-400mm lens @ 190mm
1/320 sec @ f5
iso 200
© Teklanika Photography 2013

“Colorado Elk”

© Teklanika Photography 2013
© Teklanika Photography 2013

“Colorado Elk”

Elk or Wapiti (Cervus canadensis)
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado
04/12/2013
Canon 7D
Canon 100-400mm lens @ 400mm
1/250 sec @ f5.6
iso 200
© Teklanika Photography 2013

Larger Wolf Packs Less Successful in Hunting Elk

courtesy of the Salt Lake Tribune
by Brian Maffly

A few weeks ago Yellowstone National Park officials discovered the carcass of one of the park’s deadliest wolves, an aging male that scientists knew to be an aggressive bison hunter.

Wolf No. 495 died naturally, but his body bore bruises consistent with injuries inflicted in an encounter with large game, according to Dan MacNulty, an assistant professor of wildlife ecology at Utah State University.

The wounds found on No. 495 help explain MacNulty’s latest findings that wolves’ hunting success bears little correlation to the size of the hunting party beyond four wolves. Wolves hunt in groups because taking down large hoofed animals is not only challenging but dangerous.

But if the attack party exceeds four animals, the chance of success levels off, according to research MacNulty and colleagues published this week in the journal Behavioral Ecology.

Click here to read the rest of the story